Treatments for Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Diabetic foot ulcers are open wounds that typically form on the bottom of the feet in people with diabetes. These wounds generally heal slowly and are prone to infection. They also tend to recur even after they have healed. There are various treatments available for diabetic foot ulcers, including removing or minimizing weight placed on the foot, called offloading, and taking antibiotics for infections. Sometimes, removing dead tissue around the ulcer, a process called debridement, may be necessary. Utilizing a patient-centered approach is necessary for selecting appropriate treatments and achieving best possible outcomes. For more information about treatments for diabetic foot ulcers, consult with a podiatrist today.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Mina Abadeer from Lower Limb Institute. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in and around Hackensack and Edison, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care

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